Valenwood

There's no such thing as a good day to lose a friend

In the summer of 2010, I'd hit a strange place in my life. I was revolted with my job, and had just become aware of this neat little community of folks who were producing independent web-based shows, reviewing all sorts of stuff on this website called That Guy With The Glasses. These were just people who had picked up cameras and started running with their own ideas, and they were successful, they had big audiences and they were doing really creative things. These were people who had the same interests I did, were into the same things, doing something I really wanted to do. So, with all the huberis and foolhardiness of youth, and with a few thousand dollars to my name and no bills to pay, I quit my job and started playing around with ideas for my own show.

As far as producing went, I did everything wrong, but I will never regret the time I spent trying to do it. I'd set up the bar in my parents' basement as a sort of all-purpose set and studio and spent just about all day, every day down there, ostensibly working on development, scripting, filming, redecorating... and trying to integrate myself into the community. A number of producers were doing a lot of livestreaming back then, but one in particular who was on during the day was Justin "JewWario" Carmical. I never missed one of his streams, and as a regular, eventually he started recognizing my name and saying hi to me when I showed up in the chat.

One day, he started talking about wanting title cards for his old episodes, and was looking for artists who might want to claim an episode to illustrate. He couldn't pay for the art, but we'd get a link under the video...

Title card art wasn't what I wanted to do, but the fact is I've always been a pretty good artist. Although I'd almost never do free artwork NOW, at the time, I was completely unknown as an artist. I had no audience and had never thought to charge money for my art. Doing a title card seemed like a decent foot in the door to me. So I volunteered.

It was the first time I had ever used a tablet to do art. I found it incredibly difficult to control the pen while looking at a screen. The result was wretched (I mean really, REALLY wretched -- http://fav.me/d31j8a9 ), but he didn't complain. Rather, after sending him a link to my gallery, he liked the rest of my art so much, he pimped my gallery on his stream on several occasions. So I did more art fan art. I stuck around the streams. And slowly, people came to know me. I made friends. A few months later, I went to my first con -- MAGFest. I met someone who became my partner in podcasting for a long time. Together, we interviewed about half the producers on TGWTG. I did his title cards (doing the art by hand, because I had no faith in tablets). Both of us were aiming for some coveted spot on the site. My partner found one as a podcaster with another producer.

Tony and I kept working together until I started noticing a name showing up regularly on my "recent visitors" box on my DeviantArt gallery. It was a vaguely familiar name -- Oancitizen. I went to my friend and brother-from-another-mother Smarty (also someone I knew through Justin, still one of my closest friends who I consider a brother). Smarty confirmed that he was one of the newbies recruited to the site and thought maybe he was looking for a title card artist. He immediately dragged us both into a call together, and sure enough, that's what this guy was up to. He asked me to do some example sketches for him while he was in the process of moving. I learned only after he decided to take me on as his artist that he had just moved 4 blocks from me.

And that's how I met my best friend. And how I got onto the site, first as an artist, then as an occasional cameo character. That's how I began to be accepted as a member of this funky, quirky, crazy, entrepreneurial, opinionated community.

It was on Justin's recommendation and advice that I moved to Charleston, SC in September 2013, in a housing arrangement with producer and host of Radio Dead Air, Nash Bozard -- a close friend of Justin's. That arrangement didn't work out, but the failing was mine, not Nash's or the advice I got from Justin. It was a worthwhile experiment and a necessary step forward in my life, even if it was followed by a step back.

There is more to our friendship. There are more friends I know only because of him. But this story is long enough. And some of it isn't the kind of thing you tell to strangers on the internet. Since that day I gave him my art and he gave me more support and encouragement than I could have dreamed of getting, we became close friends, and in a way, he was part of my family. He was more or less singlehandedly responsible for the shape of the past 4 years of my life.

Two days ago, on Thursday, January 23rd, Justin committed suicide. He shot himself in the bathroom of his home in Colorado Springs.

My last memory of him was from this year's MAGFest. He spent the last night of the con with me and m'lady in our room at the Aloft hotel. There are things that make sense, in retrospect... 20/20 hindsights that pick at my brain, trying to make me think I could have done something if I had only paid closer attention, been wiser, judged better... but I know there's no way I could have guessed it would come to this, even though I could see that he was depressed in a way I'd not seen him before. I've also known suicidal people before. It's a sad truth that I've known enough of them to know that one person's depression is not another's, and no experience could have prepared me to read his state of mind that clearly.

He spoke with my girl the day he died. They talked about dresses and he sent her a picture of how bright the moonlight was, shining on the snow at 3:00 in the morning. "As bright as day."

That was him, to me. As bright as day in the darkest, coldest times. He was there for people when they needed someone like that. He was always willing to be strong, supportive, infinitely generous with his time and his love. He changed lives, and he saved lives.

No words can express how deeply his loss is felt in our community. No words can describe how precious and how IMPORTANT his life was. No one can measure how much he gave to the world, because it was more than himself. He was a man who gave other people to the world, by saving their lives, by finding their strengths, by showing off their virtues, by keeping them as friends. That is his legacy -- *WE* are his legacy, the people whose lives were changed for the better because he was in them. He was a good producer, an entertaining and creative man, and one of the best friends anyone could ever hope to have.

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Valenwood

I can haz dog.



I figured I should probably mention that I finally got something I've wanted since I was a kid:

A dog.

That handsome boy is Jackson. He's a purebred shelter mutt. We don't really know what his pedigree is at all. The shelter called him a "rottweiler mix," which he may well be because he does these funny dances and silly walks, but he's half the size of a rottie. I was guessing he might have some beagle in him, maybe some pointer because he DOES tend to stand in a pointer pose when he's looking intently at something. But mostly... I have no idea.

He has no training, which is a challenge right now, but easily solved. He is a really good dog, generally, he just has a bad habit of jumping and mouthing at people. He doesn't know any basic commands and REALLY needs to be taught "NO" and "DOWN." But the great thing about dogs is... they totally learn that shit if you know how to teach them. I just... don't. So he'll be going to an obedience class ASAP.

He's quite a character and the most loving little boy... he really wants nothing more than to be with me all the time. He's SO happy and I swear, I have never seen a dog with so little aggression in them. I have never heard him bark or growl. He's met now about 10 dogs in our neighborhood... some, he's content just to sniff and give otherwise very little attention to... some of them have been very territorial with him... There's some kind of tiny terrier thing across the street, and a lady with a papillion and a dachshund who ran down the driveway and circled him barking their faces off, and the scraggly mutt next door named Rinka will tolerate him being around but she barks and if he shows too much interest she jumps and snarls at him...

His reaction to all of them has been exactly the same: "Oh hey. Cool. So what's up?" Totally laid back, totally non-reactive. When he meets really NICE dogs, he just wants to play with them. That's also all he wants to do with children -- though he's big enough that I don't let him try to play with the REALLY little kids in the neighborhood, but the 7+ year olds just LOVE him. He gives basically NEGATIVE fucks about cats we've seen on our walks. And curiously, a lot of my neighbors here have RABBITS who they allow to just run around in the yard most of the time. Jackson's only response to THEM has been... enthusiastic-enough curiosity that the rabbits won't let him near and I don't necessarily trust him not to hurt one if he were allowed to run after one off the leash. I don't think he would MEAN to hurt one, but I do think he might do it by accident just due to not knowing how delicate a bunny is if he tried to play with it or pick it up.

So... I have a slightly dumb dog whose manners need work but whose temperament is just SO wonderful. It was worth the hours I spent on PetFinder.com and the 3 trips I took to the shelter before I found him. He charms the socks off of everyone he meets. I took him for his first vet visit 2 days ago and he never whined or resisted a single thing they did to him. He just kinda stood there and took it. Which absolutely THRILLED the vet and vet techs. And having an animal whose major motivation in life is just being with me is... kind of beautiful. :)

I am so happy to have found this dog. He's going to be my buddy and my partner-in-crime for as long as he lives, which hopefully will be another decade or more.

This entry was crossposted from http://gethenian.dreamwidth.org/19907.html by means of a complex system of gears and levers run by a squirrel-powered perpetual motion machine and operated by volunteer Buddhist robots. The establishment thanks you for leaving all lolcat-themed items with the attendant dressed as a mince pie in the lobby before commenting. Ovaltine. Burma-Shave.
Valenwood

Ven sings some karaoke, for your earz.



Some of our audience asked me to record a full version of the Candle in the Wind gag from the Mister Lonely review.

So I did.

I don't claim to have done it WELL, but I don't think it's too terrible for someone whose audio/video editing abilities can be described as "open programs included on computer at purchase, smash buttons until a song comes out."

This entry was crossposted from http://gethenian.dreamwidth.org/19213.html by means of a complex system of gears and levers run by a squirrel-powered perpetual motion machine and operated by volunteer Buddhist robots. The establishment thanks you for leaving all lolcat-themed items with the attendant dressed as a mince pie in the lobby before commenting. Ovaltine. Burma-Shave.
Valenwood

"The Sciences Sing a Lullabye" by Albert Goldbarth

Physics says: go to sleep. Of course
you’re tired. Every atom in you
has been dancing the shimmy in silver shoes
nonstop from mitosis to now.
Quit tapping your feet. They’ll dance
inside themselves without you. Go to sleep.

Geology says: it will be all right. Slow inch
by inch America is giving itself
to the ocean. Go to sleep. Let darkness
lap at your sides. Give darkness an inch.
You aren’t alone. All of the continents used to be
one body. You aren’t alone. Go to sleep.

Astronomy says: the sun will rise tomorrow,
Zoology says: on rainbow-fish and lithe gazelle,
Psychology says: but first it has to be night, so
Biology says: the body-clocks are stopped all over town
and
History says: here are the blankets, layer on layer, down and down.

This entry was crossposted from http://gethenian.dreamwidth.org/18461.html by means of a complex system of gears and levers run by a squirrel-powered perpetual motion machine and operated by volunteer Buddhist robots. The establishment thanks you for leaving all lolcat-themed items with the attendant dressed as a mince pie in the lobby before commenting. Ovaltine. Burma-Shave.
Valenwood

Book Review: Songmaster

Songmaster by Orson Scott Card

I recently re-read this book because, for many years from maybe age 11 or so until I guess 15 or 16, I considered it my favourite book. I hadn't read it since my copy was confiscated when I tried to read it during "Enrichment" period in 9th grade (that being when anyone who didn't want to go to daily Mass was allowed to sit in a classroom and read anything from a list of approved books that were supposed to be good for our souls or something I guess). I was inspired to give this book another read after seeing yet MORE bashing of Orson Scott Card. Apparently it's not cool to read or like his writing anymore because he's a horrible person or something.

And yeah, I know, he IS kind of a douchewad. I don't argue that point. He's not a nice person. He's seemingly not a GOOD person. He gives every impression of being a person who needs to be kicked in the teeth. With a penis. Perhaps his own.

But here's the thing about authors: They don't matter. If an author is a raging piece of shit, that's not a reason to boycott their works. In some cases, it may well be a reason to seek them out. In any event, the content of an author's soul does not determine the content of their works, and all writing should be studied with NO knowledge of the author as well as with the context of knowledge about the author's beliefs and life circumstances. If the writing holds up on its own, then the author's identity shouldn't matter.

Anyway, Songmaster.

Unsurprisingly, it's not as good as I remember it being. That wasn't unexpected -- I was smart when I was 11 but I wasn't an adult when I was 11. Or when I was 15 or 16 or whenever I last read this book... either way, more than 10 years ago. If you know anything about the book, it will amaze you to hear that I had no memory whatsoever of there being even so much as a MENTION of homosexuality in it. If you DON'T know anything about the book, allow me to explain that Collapse )

So, part of the reason I re-read this book was also to see whether it showed any evidence of homophobic attitudes. I didn't REMEMBER any, but that meant nothing. The spoiler-cut incident is... pretty strongly homophobic, I suppose, if you choose to look at it that way and assume that the author made the choice to have Ansset's first sexual partner be male instead of female and thus have consequences so graphically dire as a punishment for gay sex. It's mildly damning, but at the same time, the narrative does explain that the consequences of near-fatal pain would have been the same regardless of who Ansset's partner had been, and Josif is actually BISEXUAL and in fact in a happy marriage with a year-old child at this point...

...which I would be happy to argue until the cows came home if it wasn't also for the fact that the book's universe is written as primarily homophobic. Guards and government workers at the highest level short of EMPEROR OF THE UNIVERSE display shockingly homophobic attitudes and totally get away with it, are surprised when they are called on it, as if it never occurred to them that there might be anything wrong with thinking like that.

This is in a distant future after the colonization, by humanity, of countless planets, after those planets have turned warlike and then been reunited under a single government, THOUSANDS of years in the future... I think the book actually says it's something like 3000 years in the future...

And in 3000 years, humanity has somehow not become enlightened enough that the guards and highest ranking government appointees, answerable only to the Emperor himself, have attained those positions without ever having had to sit through a workshop on political correctness and tolerance.... the government seemingly has no laws enforcing equality or punishing hate crimes... the man who brought peace to humanity doesn't screen for Westboro Baptists or pedophiles in his personal guard and assistants...

I don't buy it. I just... really don't. This is supposed to be an enlightened society, technologically advanced, artistically evolved, economically stable, inhabiting hundreds of planets with no war, minimal crime, prosperity on a scale un-dreamed-of in our time... and they still thing Teh Gays are gross nasty freaky fucks who deserve to be bullied, tortured, mutilated, and ultimately either murdered or driven to suicide?

I see why Mr. Card has drawn certain criticisms towards his character of late.

BUT HEY GUESS WHAT.

That isn't the whole book. That's not even the main plot or theme of the book. And there's another thing: The straight characters don't fare any better, really. If anything, while the narrative does seem to reflect an attitude of homophobia on the author's part, one could argue that he just hates sex -- ALL sex. Love is a major theme of the book, but whenever it becomes sexual love, it becomes tragic. It's like the author thinks sex pollutes love somehow. I understand celebrating platonic forms of love -- I understand it DEEPLY -- but this just goes into kind of a... weird place. In this book, all lovers are punished -- not just the gays. The only forms of love that are ultimately rewarded are kinds of love that exist between friends, between parents and children, between teachers and students, between citizens and their leaders, between performers and their audience, between oneself and one's home... between oneself and one's heroes. And these are all wonderful, exquisite, praiseworthy forms of love that SHOULD be celebrated, but never at the expense of other kinds of love, and certainly not by excluding any other kind of love as invalid and impure. Sex isn't something that can or should be experienced by a child or used by children to relate to people -- and for most of the book, the main character is a child, physically if not mentally -- but that doesn't mean it's inherently WRONG.

I'm digressing. A lot.

So this book... the story goes like this:

Collapse )


So that's the story.

What made me love it was the language. Most of it is about communication through song -- everything from casual conversation to manipulation of people's deepest selves happens through music. It's satisfying on a very deep level to me, as a singer. I used to love to imagine that I might be able to do that. I sort of still love to imagine that. And maybe, on some level, it's true.

Homophobia aside, while this book is... unpolished, sort of juvenile... I think a better writer could have turned it into something twice, even three times as long, maybe more... I think this is still a damn good book. I think it would be a good book no matter who its author was...

BOTTOM LINE: ...and I think anyone who loves music should read it. I think it's better than Ender's Game. I think this is a book that does more good for the world than anything its author could ever accomplish in his attempts to be a dickhead.

This entry was crossposted from http://gethenian.dreamwidth.org/17697.html by means of a complex system of gears and levers run by a squirrel-powered perpetual motion machine and operated by volunteer Buddhist robots. The establishment thanks you for leaving all lolcat-themed items with the attendant dressed as a mince pie in the lobby before commenting. Ovaltine. Burma-Shave.
Valenwood

Book Review: The Fault In Our Stars

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

Basically, John Green is an incredible human.

For those unacquainted with his astonishing awesome, he has a metric fuckton of online videos, the only ones with which I am actually familiar being the Crash Course series, which are all educational and fantastically funny.

As spoiler free as this can get:

The Fault In Our Stars is a YA book about two older teens with cancer who meet at a support group, bond over a book they both decide is perfect, travel to Amsterdam to track down its reclusive author, and fall in love with each other. Other stuff happens which I will not give away. This isn't really exactly a "love story" book. The love story happens, it's central to the plot, but this isn't a YA Romance Novel. It's a for-all-ages-over-12-or-so straightforward Good Book.

Despite the whole Cancer Thing, it is not depressing. It is staggeringly beautiful, triumphantly well-written, honest without being maudlin, tragic without being hopeless, and real without being cruel.

It is also, at around 300 pages, very short. It is possible to finish in one day. I did it in three, because I was reading at work and reading slowly. It's the kind of book you want to read slowly. It's worth taking the time to take it in like that.

Bottom Line: It is a book I think is Important to read. Highly recommended. 5 stars.

This entry was crossposted from http://gethenian.dreamwidth.org/17524.html by means of a complex system of gears and levers run by a squirrel-powered perpetual motion machine and operated by volunteer Buddhist robots. The establishment thanks you for leaving all lolcat-themed items with the attendant dressed as a mince pie in the lobby before commenting. Ovaltine. Burma-Shave.
Valenwood

Catching up on book reviews...

SOME OF THE REVIEWS BELOW CONTAIN MINOR SPOILERS. But they are minor. Usually. You have been duly warned.

This post contains 14 book reviews. They are as follows:

1. The Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons (4 books in all)
2. The Terror by Dan Simmons
3. Bonnie Before the Brain Implants by Keith Blenman
4. The Cloud Atlas by Liam Callanan
5. Cloud Atlas: A Novel by David Mitchell
6. Phases of Gravity by Dan Simmons
7. Drood by Dan Simmons
8 & 9. Ilium and Olympos by Dan Simmons
10. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
11. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Let's do this thing.




1. The Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons
This series includes 4 books. I will address each one individually then sum them up at the end.


~Hyperion
I have made note of this in a previous entry, and I hold to what I said in that review. This is the first book to have genuinely FRIGHTENED me since I was maybe 8 years old. That's 20 years of devouring books and not one of them has scared me like this. It's the good kind of scary -- the horror movie kind where you start jumping at every little noise because something is just so vivid, so perfectly terrifying, you have no choice but to start believing it's right… behind… that door…

This book is a compilation of 7 tales from 7 very different characters, all told in the framework of a quest. The stories are all as different as their tellers -- they contain themes of religion, poetry, war and violence, family and honoring one's parents, sex and honoring one's king…

Even if you don't want to read an entire series, you should read this book. Let it stand alone just for those stories, and decide at the end if you want to go on. It's a hell of a journey from here in more ways than one…


~~The Fall of Hyperion
This book branches out from the Pilgrims in the previous book and explores their world… or rather worlds. 150 linked planets throughout the solar system are preparing to go to war against an alien force of evolved humans, while humanity's ascended artificial intelligences try to both guide and hinder them. This story is told mainly from the point of view of Joseph Severn -- the clone of a clone of poet John Keats, who was a character in one of the 7 pilgrims' stories in the previous book -- as he observes how the leader of all 150 worlds, Meina Gladstone, comes to terms with the fact that in order to save humanity, she may have to orchestrate the greatest holocaust in human history.

This is a gear-shifting book that is completely unlike the first book, but for all the right reasons. It's a political thriller IN SPACE.


~~~Endymion
FAST FORWARD! Almost 300 years after the events in book 2, an anonymous dude from an out-of-the-way planet is sentenced to death for being a douchebag to some rich duck hunters, rescued from death by a character from the previous books, and sent on an impossible quest -- first to the Time Tombs (the goal of the original 7 pilgrims), and then to a world that may no longer exist, to topple the empire of the Catholic Church and keep safe the girl who will become the savior of all mankind. Pursued by a warrior-priest and his few loyal holy soldiers, Raoul, the young Aenea, and their cyborg friend A. Bettik flee the Church as they search for an impossible place -- Earth.

Once again, this book represents a major shift in setting a POV from the previous two, but for all the best reasons and with all the best results. This lays the groundwork for the final tale that will answer all questions and determine the fate of the human race…


~~~~The Rise of Endymion
This book describes the final struggle between all previously established groups -- the 150 worlds of the Hegemony, the Ousters, the Shrike, the pilgrims of the Time Tombs, the ascended AIs, Aenea and Raoul -- and determines the fate of mankind.

I will say nothing more.


BOTTOM LINE: This is the best book series I have ever read. This is better than Lord of the Rings. This is better than Discworld. This is better than EVERYTHING. This series speaks to my lit-loving soul. This has everything -- poetry, time travel, religion and the debunking thereof, death and rebirth, artificial intelligences, quantum theory, gods, monsters, epic space battles, Dick Tracey detectives, astonishing settings, adventure, love, technology, politics… If you like science-fiction, it's almost impossible not to LOVE this series. This is the new required reading of sci-fi, in my mind. It is… a perfect series. Perfectly structured, perfectly told, and perfect in the spirit of classic science fiction -- a vision of humanity's hardships that ends in hope and the timelessness of all that we understand to be important now and forever.

Read it. If you do nothing else I ever tell you to do, read these books.


----------


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THAT'S ALL FOLKS!

14 books in 5 months. Wow.

You may have noticed I have a sort of a… thing… for Dan Simmons.

I have realized that he is easily by this point my favourite author. I cannot get enough of his writing. I have, now, read over 6,000 pages of it, and I still want more. I've almost read more of his writing than all of my other favourite authors COMBINED.

I actually managed to hunt down his mailing address and sent him actual fan mail. That is massively dorky but for me, it's quite a novelty to have a favourite author who didn't die 100+ years before I was born. And who is still alive. Yeah.

Anyway, here are the coming attractions:

Currently Reading:
1. American Gods by Neil Gaiman
2. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
3. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig


COMING SOON: (In no particular order)

1. American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
2. Long Time Passing by Thomas Watson
3. The First Four Notes: Beethoven's Fifth and the Human Imagination by Matthew Guerrieri
4. Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl
5. Songmaster by Orson Scott Card
6. Mirror, Mirror by Gregory Maguire
7. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

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Valenwood

Coming soon to Ven's book reviews...

I just realized I haven't posted reviews of anything I've read since Hyperion. I will fix that tomorrow. Right now, a list of things I need to review, and the next items on the reading list:

To Review:
~The Fall of Hyperion
~~Endymion
~~~The Rise of Endymion by Dan Simmons
~The Terror by Dan Simmons
~Bonnie Before the Brain Implants by Keith Blenman
~The Cloud Atlas by Liam Callanan, not to be confused with
~Cloud Atlas, A Novel by David Mitchell (This is the one the movie was based on)
~Phases of Gravity by Dan Simmons
~Drood by Dan Simmons
~Ilium by Dan Simmons
~Olympos by Dan Simmons

I um... I kind of love Dan Simmons. Not only do I love him in a way I haven't loved an author since I was a teenager, I have, by this point, read FAR, FAR more of his writing than I have ever read of any other author (not counting re-readings). And oh yes, I fully intend to read more. As much more as I can get.

BUT! I have made a promise to myself to try to keep my reading at least SLIGHTLY varied. So here is my list of books to be read, all of which are on my Kindle now (but may not necessarily be read in the order they are listed):
[*Books in smaller font are re-reads of books I either loved but haven't been back to in over a decade, or hated that long ago and want to give them another chance.]

1. Song of Kali by Dan Simmons (I CAN STOP WHENEVER I WANT TO, OKAY??!)
2. American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
3. Long Time Passing by Thomas Watson
4. The First Four Notes: Beethoven's Fifth and the Human Imagination by Matthew Guerrieri
5. American Gods by Neil Gaiman
6. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
7. Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl
8. Songmaster by Orson Scott Card
9. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
10. Mirror, Mirror by Gregory Maguire
11. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

This entry was crossposted from http://gethenian.dreamwidth.org/17130.html by means of a complex system of gears and levers run by a squirrel-powered perpetual motion machine and operated by volunteer Buddhist robots. The establishment thanks you for leaving all lolcat-themed items with the attendant dressed as a mince pie in the lobby before commenting. Ovaltine. Burma-Shave.
Valenwood

"500" by r.i.d.

(reposted from [personal profile] ashen_key)

"500" by r.i.d.


it took me so long
to wrap my fingers
around another girl’s
that by the time i had done so,
i’d been told real gays
came out early, what was i
even hiding from – well, okay
but when people think you’re straight
they say the things they
wouldn’t otherwise, their
tongues touch upon secrets like
why can’t bi people just choose a side
as if sexuality is as simple as
football teams – and on that note
society spends more reverence on sports
than it does on the education of
such individuals as all
sixty-seven (and counting) people
who have asked me “a gay-person question”
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